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Wingman Saves Program

Wingman Saves Program

Wingman Saves Program

MCCONNELL AIR FORCE BASE, Kan. --

MCCONNELL AIR FORCE BASE, Kan. --

The 931st Air Refueling Wing implemented an Air Force Reserve-specific program called Wingman Saves in the fall of 2020. The purpose of this program is to highlight Reserve Airmen and civilians who take action to help a fellow member in need.

Not to be confused with the Airman’s Medal, which is awarded to U.S. Air Force and Space Force members who distinguish themselves by acts of heroism involving voluntary risk of life, non-combat related. The Wingman Saves Program is for more subtle acts, not directly risking one’s own life to save another.

“For something as simple as working out with a fellow wingman who failed or is at risk of failing their fitness test would qualify for an Airman Saves action.” Says Lindsay Weaver, 931st Air Refueling Wing Director of Psychological Health. “The criteria is life or career changing efforts.”

Another means of being a good wingman is utilizing the ACE method, Ask, Care and Escort. Identifying when a fellow Airmen is struggling and showing signs of potential suicide, escort or direct that member to the local chaplain, first sergeant or Director of Psychological Health.

“This program recognizes conscientious wingman who take action when they see a fellow airman in distress. Those who are an outspoken wingman for their peers.” Said Weaver.

Since the inception, there have been three members awarded for their noble wingman actions. This includes a distinctive Wingman Saves coin and certificate from Lt. Gen. Richard Scobee, Commander of the Air Force Reserve Command.

To nominate someone who acted in a way to help a member in need, a fellow member simply fills out the “Wingman Saves ‘intervention’ Submission Form” located on the AFRC Shareoint site, and emails it to the AFRC Integrated Resilience Team. If assistance is needed in filling it out, contact Ms. Lindsay Weaver at 316-570-3645 or lindsay.weaver.1@us.af.mil.

The submission form does not have information on it that identifies the person in need for confidentiality reasons.

“I am so very proud of the Airmen I work alongside here at the 931st.” said Col. Phil Heseltine, 931st Air Refueling Wing Commander. “Every time I hear a story of Airman looking out for one other, going above and beyond to make sure someone is taken care of mentally and emotionally, it just fills me with a sense of pride. I was thrilled to see that AFRC came out with a way to recognize those Airmen. “